Aug 19

Perspectives

Painting the Birds of Buenaventura

By Harold Eyster I sit on a bench, painting the Green Honeycreepers that indulge in the hummingbird feeders at Buenaventura Reserve in southern Ecuador. I've been here for two weeks, painting and observing the birds of this preserve. My concentration on my painting is pleasantly disrupted by the fluid elocutions… Read more >>

Aug 12

From the Field

Birdlife of the Equator: A Virtual Trip to Ecuador

By Benjamin Skolnik Have you ever been to the Equator? If not, I highly recommend taking the journey to the small country of Ecuador (named after zero degrees latitude), which is a wonderfully small nation that is easily traveled, safe, and a sampler of what the tropics have to offer.… Read more >>

Aug 08

From the Field

More Millerbirds, More Problems … if You're a Field Biologist

22 July–4 August | By Megan Dalton I was lucky enough to be one of the Millerbird monitors for both this and last year’s tour, and one of the great things about coming back to Laysan is seeing first-hand how the Millerbird population has grown. Over six months of intensive monitoring… Read more >>

Jul 25

From the Field

A Tubenose's First Milestone: Facing the Air and Sea

July 5-21, 2014 | By Robby Kohley Millerbird Update: We have been on Laysan for three weeks, and with camp establishment, familiarization, and general training behind us, we have settled into a daily routine that focuses on population monitoring of Millerbirds. We are just getting started but we are already excited… Read more >>

Jul 17

From the Field

Fresh Meat for Flies: First Impressions of Laysan Island

July 7, 2014 It has been a week since I arrived on Laysan Island with fellow field biologists Megan Dalton and Robby Kohley. We have been sent to Laysan, a small island in the Northwest Hawaiian chain about 930 miles northwest from Honolulu, to monitor a population of translocated Millerbirds.… Read more >>

Jun 04

News

Behind the Scenes: First-ever Black-capped Petrel Satellite Tracking

By Rob Ronconi Locally known as diablotín, which translates loosely to “little devil,” the Black-capped Petrel (Pterodroma hasitata) is one of the world’s most imperiled and least known seabirds. This species was thought to be extinct for most of the 20th century, then was rediscovered in 1963 nesting high up… Read more >>

May 28

News

Northern Climes to Nicaragua: Long-distance Migrants on Shade Coffee Farms

By Scott Weidensaul The challenges facing bird conservation can seem insurmountable. And it's true that some of the threats—climate change, habitat loss—are overwhelming in their scope. But as American Bird Conservancy has been pointing out for years, sometimes even the smallest changes can have enormous effects, from keeping your cat… Read more >>

May 02

From the Field

Isla Santa Clara: Restoring Habitat for Pink-footed Shearwater

By Holly Freifeld The zodiac’s bow smacked the choppy water hard on the approach to the little island’s landing site: a slippery, wave-washed tongue of rock. We each steeled ourselves for the scramble over the gunwale and onto the rocks in that unpredictable split-second when the boat, the water, and… Read more >>

Apr 23

Perspectives

Help Save Wood Thrush: Drink Bird-Friendly Coffee

By Bridget Stutchbury The Wood Thrush is an ambassador for the forest birds of eastern North America, and a modern-day "canary in the coal mine." According to the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), this species has declined by over 50 percent since systematic counts began in the late 1960s. I wrote… Read more >>

Apr 18

From the Field

Unexpected Dividends: Migratory Sandpipers in a Bolivian Reserve

By John Nielsen First and last, save habitat. If you had to pick a single rule for bird conservation groups to follow that would probably be it. Nobody ever looks back and says, “I wish we had saved less bird habitat,” for one thing. For another, the rewards for preserving… Read more >>