Donation Goal: $1,000,000

$777,605 Raised

78% Funded

About Our Campaign

CAMPAIGN GOAL:

To begin scaling up, we need to raise at least $1 million by the end of this year. ABC board members and friends are challenging our supporters by matching gifts up to $500,000 through December 31, 2016.

FOCAL SPECIES:

Focal-pic_California-Condor_Greg-HomelCalifornia Condor by Greg Homel

Prothonotary Warbler (photo by Mark Johnson)
Prothonotary Warbler by Mark Johnson

Rufous Hummingbird (photo by Feng Yu)
Rufous Hummingbird by Feng Yu

Swaisons Hawk (photo by Sarah Jessup)
Swainson’s Hawk by Sarah Jessup

Thank you for your contribution. This campaign has officially ended.

Our half of the world—the Western Hemisphere—is home to the greatest animal migration in the world. Despite the huge changes mankind has made to the American landscape, billions of birds still lift up, take to the skies, and migrate twice each year. This is our Serengeti: our own miraculous, airborne, animal spectacle at which we marvel.

But it's time to do more than marvel. Migratory birds are in trouble, and we must act. Will you donate today to help us lift up migratory birds? Your gift between now and December 31 will be matched dollar-for-dollar up to $500,000.

Habitat loss throughout the Americas is threatening entire suites of migratory birds. Flyways are fraught with growing, man-made threats: wind energy projects sited in migratory pathways, toxic pesticides, reflective windows, free-roaming cats.

Falling bird numbers tell the story. If you have been a bird lover for a while, you have noticed. Will you help American Bird Conservancy and our partners save migratory birds with an extra year-end gift?

Tundra Swans flying dangerously close to one of migratory birds biggest threats, wind turbines.

Over the last three years, we have gathered the best science about migratory birds, analyzed the data, and determined the most important large-scale areas—places we're calling Birdscapes—that we must protect and restore to reverse the downward spiral of entire suites of declining migratory birds.

We have sought the best partners, formed teams, developed pilot projects, and produced Best Management Practices for grassland, forest, and coastal migratory birds. We have identified gaps in our knowledge and expertise. And we have gone to work. You can help migratory birds today.

Migratory birds both common and rare benefit from our efforts to lift up migratory birds. The Grasshopper Sparrow, a grassland species, is one example. Photo by Luke Seitz

Migratory birds both common and rare benefit from our efforts to lift up migratory birds. The Grasshopper Sparrow, a grassland species, is one example. Photo by Luke Seitz

This is the largest, most ambitious bird conservation challenge ever undertaken. Reducing threats and conserving habitat for migratory birds on a meaningful, full life-cycle scale will be the work of decades. But there are annual benchmarks we will reach along the way, and you will see our collective progress. Help ABC help migratory birds today.

Snowy-Plover_Gerald DeBoer_Shutterstock

Snowy Plover and other vulnerable beach-nesting birds will benefit from expanded efforts to conserve species across breeding and wintering grounds and stopover sites in between. Photo by Gerald DeBoer/Shutterstock

Thank you for your consideration. Your support will enable future generations to marvel at the wonder of migration and the beauty of birds.