Piping Plover

Piping Plover, Stubblefield Photography, Shutterstock

At a Glance

  • Scientific Name: Charadrius melodus
  • Population: 8,000 individuals
  • Trend:  Increasing
  • Habitat: Nests on open sandy or gravel beaches and alkali flats; winters on beaches and mudflats

Piping Plover map, NatureServeThe small, sand-colored Piping Plover, named for its melodic, plaintive whistle, is a bird of beaches and barrier islands, sharing this habitat with Least Terns, Black Skimmers, and Wilson's Plovers.

Beaches are also popular with people, and their impacts have caused serious declines in Piping Plover populations. Shoreline development and stabilization projects, free-roaming cats and other predators, poorly sited wind turbines, gas/oil industry operations, and global warming are some of the biggest threats to this species.

Beach Sprites

Piping Plovers resemble wind-up toys as they dart along the beach in search of food, taking a wide variety of insects, marine worms, and crustaceans. They nest in small depressions in the sand called scrapes and often nest in the same area with Least Terns.


Sign up for ABC's eNews to learn how you can help protect birds


Like many other plover species, adult Piping Plovers employ a “broken wing display" when threatened to draw attention to themselves and away from their chicks and nest.

Piping Plover chick, Venu Challa

Piping Plover chick by Venu Challa

Saving the Piping Plover

The Piping Plover is federally listed as Endangered in the Great Lakes region and Threatened in the remainder of its U.S. breeding range; it's also listed as Endangered in Canada. The Great Lakes population is on the 2014 State of the Birds Watch List.

Critical Piping Plover nesting habitats are now protected to help the species during its breeding season. Populations have seen significant increases since the protection programs began, but the species remains in danger. For example, at popular Jones Beach near New York City, nesting Piping Plovers are threatened by a colony of feral cats. ABC is urging authorities to remove the cats for the safety of this federally protected species.

ABC is also leading a Gulf Coast conservation effort that is working to identify and implement protective measures for vulnerable beach-nesting birds and other birds, such as the Piping Plover, that winter there. Strategies include preservation of plover habitats; public education; limiting off-road vehicle (ORV) traffic; and limiting predation of free-roaming cats and dogs.


Donate to support ABC's conservation mission!


More Birds Like This

Our 400+ detailed species profiles bring birds to life across the Americas with a focus on threats and conservation.

Blue-headed Vireo. Photo by Paul Rossi.
  • Population: 13 million
  • Trend:  Increasing
Northern Harrier. Photo by Wang LiQiang, Shutterstock.
  • Population: 790,000
  • Trend:  Decreasing
  • Population: 15,000-20,000
  • Trend:  Decreasing
Burrowing Owl. Photo by Mauricio S. Ferreira, Shutterstock
  • Population: 2 million
  • Trend:  Decreasing